This information helps you explore your options and allow you to make an informed choice about where you want to give birth to your baby.

It contains details of Home Birth, Hospital Birth and leaflets and video clips to help and prepare you for your journey.

Having your baby at home

If you have a straightforward pregnancy and both you and the baby are well, you might choose to give birth at home.

If you give birth at home, you’ll be supported by a midwife who will be with you while you’re in labour. If you need any help or your labour is not progressing as well as it should, your midwife will make arrangements for you to be transferred to hospital.

The advantages of giving birth at home include:

  • being in familiar surroundings where you may feel more relaxed and able to cope
  • you don’t have to interrupt your labour to go into hospital
  • you will not need to leave your other children, if you have any
  • you will not have to separated from your partner after the birth
  • you are more likely to be looked after by a midwife who you have got to know during your pregnancy

There are some things you should think about if you’re considering a home birth:

  • you may need to transfer to hospital if there are complications
  • epidurals are not available at home
  • your doctor or midwife may recommend that you give birth in hospital; for example if you are expecting twins, or if your baby is breech – your midwife or doctor will explain why they think a hospital birth is safer for you and your baby

For more information about having your baby at home please speak to your midwife.

Home birth drop-in sessions

If you would like to find out more about having your baby at home, come along to one of our information sessions to talk to our midwives. For more information check our home birth drop in session schedule.

Having your baby at hospital in our Birthing Centre

We have a purpose built birthing centre. Three of our seven birthing rooms have birthing pools, as well as beds, giving mums-to-be the option of having a water birth.

To make your experience as comfortable and relaxed as possible, each of the seven birthing rooms have décor in calming colours, adjustable mood lighting and an en-suite toilet and shower room.

As well as the seven birthing rooms our new centre includes a three bedded assessment unit.

Be prepared for your birth

If labour has to be induced

Early labour

Some questions you might like to ask your midwife:

  • If I want to use them, what aids and equipment are likely to be available in my chosen place of birth to help me change position and is there room to move around during labour?
  • Are there any reasons (such as an epidural or a monitor for the baby’s heart rate) which may make it difficult for me to get into different positions? What can we do to help me use different positions if I want to?
  • If I want them to, can people please ask permission to enter my room?
  • Is there space to safely store my own and my companions’ belongings safely?
  • If I/we want a few moments alone, how do we ask for this and how do we call the midwife back if we need them?

Pain relief

Birth